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Summer Reading

2022 Summer Reading Challenge

a sunglass wearing dog "reading" a book

 

Do you want to get a jump on Reading Workshop credit for next year?

The Martin Meylin ELA Teachers are offering an opportunity for students to keep up their reading skills over the summer and to earn credit toward next year's Reading Workshop grade.
It's as easy as 1-2-3! Read a book. Complete the deposit slip, check stub, and book response. Then get a parent / guardian's signature on the check stub. In the fall, turn the deposit slip and check stubs in to your new ELA teacher. If all required information is provided, you will receive credit for your efforts.

Here's how it works!

  • Select a book to read that you have never read before and record it on the deposit slip. Feel free to use this as a starting point for your reading. Your local public librarian will also be able to suggest other titles of interest.
  • When you finish the book, complete the check stub and book response. A list of response prompts is provided along with a sample check stub.
  • Record all of your summer books on the deposit slip. This will be your way of keeping track of your summer reading.

How do I "cash in?"

  • Bring all completed forms to your new ELA teacher in the fall.
  • You will be able to open a "Reading Workshop Checking Account."
  • A minimum deposit of 250 pages is required to open your account.
  • Each marking period, you may, at your teacher's discretion, apply credit during that marking period.
  • Packets must be turned in within the first two cycle weeks of the school year to receive credit. Packets will not be accepted after this time.
  • Graphic novels will be counted for one-third of the total pages in the book.

Additional copies of the deposit slip and check stub can be obtained online or in the middle school office.

Reading Prompts

As you read, note a line, sentence, or section that jumps out at you. Write a brief note to yourself so you can remember what you were thinking. If nothing jumps out at you by the time you have finished reading, go back and find something to respond to.
 

To write out your Reading Response, you must:

  • Label which type of reading response category you are using. Write the number on the check stub.
  • Use an original thought in your response; don’t just summarize.
  • Quote a sentence or phrase from the text that supports your thinking, and give the page number, paragraph, or line number of the quote.
  • Write at least five complete sentences.

Give an Opinion: Tell what you think or feel about a certain part, and why. You could react to an aspect of character, plot, theme, language, tone, style - anything in the text. But you must be specific. Be sure to add a quote from the text including the page number.

Ask a Question: Write a specific question. This can be a question about something you don’t understand in the text, or a larger question (about life, literature, or anything) that the text made you consider. Remember, you must still write five sentences - you can do this by explaining what you understand so far before asking the question, or by trying to
answer your question after you ask it. Be sure to add a quote from the text including the page number.

Make a Connection: A certain point in the text reminds you of another story, poem, movie, song, or something in real life. How are the two alike? Be specific. Be sure to add a quote from the text including the page number.

Character Description: You notice a detail about a character (what he or she looks like, thinks, says, or does). Why is it important? What trait or other idea does it reveal about that character? Be sure to add a quote from the text including the page number.

Detect a Conflict: You sense a conflict in the story - it can be large or small, external or internal. Describe it, and explain why it is important in the story. Be sure to add a quote from the text including the page number.

Spot the Setting: You notice a part that refers to the place or time of the story or poem. Why is it important? How does it relate to the theme, characters, or plot? Be sure to add a quote from the text including the page number.

Theme Recognition: You find a sentence or two that might connect to a theme (the message or “So what?”) of a piece. Tell the theme, and explain how that portion of text relates to it. Be sure to add a quote from the text including the page number.